Interview: We Are Harlot’s Danny Worsnop Talks Roots of the Band

Interview: We Are Harlot’s Danny Worsnop Talks Roots of the Band

We-Are-Harlot-Main-Pub-Travis-Shinn-lo

The following article is an excerpt from Revolver’s April/May 2015 issue.

By Richard Bienstock

If you’re curious as to what a day in the life of an honest-to-god rock and roll band circa 2015 is like, look no further than the Beverly Hills that, until recently, was the shared residence of We Are Harlot’s Danny Warsnop, Jeff George and Bruno Argra.

“Our alarms were set for 3:40 P.M. every day,” recounts singer Worsnop. “That gave us 20 minutes to get dressed, get out the door and get to the bar at the end of the street, ’cause happy hour started at four. We’d drink for a bunch of hours, and at around 10 P.M. we’d go back to the house and write a song. Then it was back to the bars until closing time. After that, back to the house with a bunch of friends, where things would get really wild and really, um, we’ll say ‘illegal.’ Then we’d crash out and, come 3:40 P.M., do it all again.”

The fruits of We Are Harlot’s labor—if it could indeed be called labor—can be heard on their recently released self-titled debut. And, much like the constant party that seemingly surrounded the writing process for these songs, We Are Harlot is a raucous, rowdy and, yes, wild affair. It’s a 12-song collection of high-octane, top-down spitfire rockers and arena-ready ballads that explodes with piledriving riffs, classic ’70s and ’80s swagger and huge, hooky choruses. Throughout, the rhythm section of drummer Agra and bassist Brian Weaver provide ample swing and propulsion, while George splatters the proceedings with oodles of shredtastic guitar leads.

But the biggest surprise is the unusually melodic vocal performance from Worsnop, who, until now, was known more for the raw throated screaming and guttural grunts he contributed to his former band, Asking Alexandria. Despite rising to become one of the most dynamic and charismatic frontmen in metalcore, Worsnop says that his musical background is actually quite different.

“I didn’t get into really heavy stuff until I was around 16 or 17,” he says. “And even then it wasn’t so extreme—it was stuff like Slipknot, Korn, Pantera. But my upbringing was rock and roll and the blues. My biggest inspirations were guys like Steven Tyler and Mick Jagger. I was a big Bryan Adams fan. I loved Michael Jackson. And my grandfather was a blues singer, which was a huge influence on me.”

In fact, it was Worsnop’s desire to explore these influences that first planted the seed for We Are Harlot…

For the rest, pick up our April/May 2015 issue. It is available for purchase in our webstore.

Interview: We Are Harlot’s Danny Worsnop Talks Roots of the Band

Interview: We Are Harlot’s Danny Worsnop Talks Roots of the Band

We-Are-Harlot-Main-Pub-Travis-Shinn-lo

The following article is an excerpt from Revolver’s April/May 2015 issue.

By Richard Bienstock

If you’re curious as to what a day in the life of an honest-to-god rock and roll band circa 2015 is like, look no further than the Beverly Hills that, until recently, was the shared residence of We Are Harlot’s Danny Warsnop, Jeff George and Bruno Argra.

“Our alarms were set for 3:40 P.M. every day,” recounts singer Worsnop. “That gave us 20 minutes to get dressed, get out the door and get to the bar at the end of the street, ’cause happy hour started at four. We’d drink for a bunch of hours, and at around 10 P.M. we’d go back to the house and write a song. Then it was back to the bars until closing time. After that, back to the house with a bunch of friends, where things would get really wild and really, um, we’ll say ‘illegal.’ Then we’d crash out and, come 3:40 P.M., do it all again.”

The fruits of We Are Harlot’s labor—if it could indeed be called labor—can be heard on their recently released self-titled debut. And, much like the constant party that seemingly surrounded the writing process for these songs, We Are Harlot is a raucous, rowdy and, yes, wild affair. It’s a 12-song collection of high-octane, top-down spitfire rockers and arena-ready ballads that explodes with piledriving riffs, classic ’70s and ’80s swagger and huge, hooky choruses. Throughout, the rhythm section of drummer Agra and bassist Brian Weaver provide ample swing and propulsion, while George splatters the proceedings with oodles of shredtastic guitar leads.

But the biggest surprise is the unusually melodic vocal performance from Worsnop, who, until now, was known more for the raw throated screaming and guttural grunts he contributed to his former band, Asking Alexandria. Despite rising to become one of the most dynamic and charismatic frontmen in metalcore, Worsnop says that his musical background is actually quite different.

“I didn’t get into really heavy stuff until I was around 16 or 17,” he says. “And even then it wasn’t so extreme—it was stuff like Slipknot, Korn, Pantera. But my upbringing was rock and roll and the blues. My biggest inspirations were guys like Steven Tyler and Mick Jagger. I was a big Bryan Adams fan. I loved Michael Jackson. And my grandfather was a blues singer, which was a huge influence on me.”

In fact, it was Worsnop’s desire to explore these influences that first planted the seed for We Are Harlot…

For the rest, pick up our April/May 2015 issue. It is available for purchase in our webstore.

Country Stars Have Little Big Town’s Back in “Girl Crush” Controversy

Country Stars Have Little Big Town’s Back in “Girl Crush” Controversy
I think Miranda Lambert spoke for all of the country stars when she said, “I got a song crush.” She just wrote that on Twitter. And that song she’s crushing on is the one every other country star can’t stop talking about — Little Big Town’s “Girl Crush.” The stars are flooding social media with… Read more »

Kendrick Lamar and Prince hit the studio together

Kendrick Lamar and Prince hit the studio together

Kendrick Lamar has been making the radio rounds recently to discuss his impeccable new record, To Pimp A Butterfly. He’s spent a lot of time discussing the album title (apparently he didn’t make the To Kill A Mockingbird connection until after it was released), his goal with the record, and even the cover art. But in one interview with NYC’s Hot 97, Kendrick revealed an interesting collaborator who he recently recorded with: Prince.

Lamar said that when he was at the Purple One’s Paisley Park Estate in Minnesota for a Yahoo! live stream last October, they entered the studio together. “We was vibing, but we was pressed, man,” Kendrick explained. Sadly, they couldn’t get a track together before Kendrick had to leave.

Even still, Kendrick took away plenty from the experience. “I didn’t trip over getting a song done. I really appreciate the actual game he was giving me … He took control of his music,” Kendrick said. “He was breaking down some things that I need to consider in my career. Just really taking control of your creativity.”

You can watch the whole interview below; the Prince remarks begin around the 38:00 mark.

In a separate interview on Power 106’s The Cruz Show (apparently on the same day, based on the wardrobe), K-Dot talked about an alternate album name. “How Much a Dollar Costs”, track 11 on To Pimp A Butterfly, actually originated as a title track.

What’s more, he said the song he performed onThe Colbert Report last October would likely remain “just for me.” Later on, he revealed some unused lyrics from the second verse of a track produced by Soundwave and Terrace Martin — likely “King Kunta”, the only track both producers worked on alone together. He dug through his memory and delivered a few bars:

“I made a video out there so the homies could see/ to let ‘em know it’s more than just parmalee (?)/ He said good look and paused the video the moment his phone ring/ the fast dialer was his only problem/ No matter how many times I show them the Eiffel Tower, the block was home/ and Africa was too far for power.”

There were apparently more “brutal” lyrics in the verse, but he wanted to keep them close to his chest in case he wanted to use them later. Check the whole interview, which opens with the alternate title comments and closes with the unused lyrics, below.

Photos: Silverstein Behind the Scenes of ‘Discovering the Waterfront’ Anniversary Tour

Photos: Silverstein Behind the Scenes of ‘Discovering the Waterfront’ Anniversary Tour
[futureusgallerycaption id=”attachment_72491″ align=”aligncenter” width=”630″]Photo: David Pike Photo: David Pike
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While Silverstein was headlining their 10-year anniversary tour for ‘Discovering the Waterfront,’ they took a bunch of disposable cameras out on the road with them. Here, the band and crew documented a raw behind-the-scenes look at life on the road.

Check out the pics below and let us know what you think in the comments!

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Darius Rucker Works It Out Southern Style

Darius Rucker Works It Out Southern Style
The fourth time could be the biggest charm yet for Darius Rucker with this week’s arrival of his new solo album, Southern Style. With the success of the project’s first single, “Homegrown Honey,” it’s already a winner for the singer-songwriter. Official chart numbers including the album won’t be out until next week, of course, but… Southern Style“>Read more »